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-hour -- the british prime minister since a shock wave through the eu, promising a referendum on britain's membership. >> time to cobble together a coalition after the israeli prime minister just scrapes through with an election victory. >> did germany's education minister plagiarize her phd? her university launches an investigation. talk about putting a cap amongst the pigeons a day after german and french leaders pledged to deepen e u's economic and monetary union. the british prime minister has signaled his country could want out. >> in a very -- delayed speech, david cameron said he wants to renegotiate the terms of britain's membership and the referendum, but not until the end of 2017. >> that has rattled london's biggest allies and some investors. more uncertainty and possible of people are not what they have been wishing for. >> kamen said he'd campaigned for es you vote, saying he had won the decisions he had -- the concessions he had campaigned on. >> the move had long been anticipated at home and across the european union. david cameron laid out his vision of britain's future. it is one tha
government's position on britain's role in the eu. he pledged to hold a referendum on britain's future in the eshoo if conservatives win the next election. he took questions from the british house of commons. this is 35 minutes. >> prime minister. >> question number one a, dilma, mr. speaker. -- thank you, mr. speaker. i am sure the whole house will wish to draw any in paying attribute to david robert shaw. he died and queen elizabeth hospital birmingham last wednesday as a result of wounds that he sustained in afghanistan. he gave his life for the safety of the british people, and his incredibly great contribution must never be forgotten. our profound condolences are with his loved ones. this morning, i had meetings with ministerial colleagues and others, and in addition to my duties in this house i shall have a further meetings today. >> i am sure the whole house and the whole country would want to associate themselves with the prime minister's comments about david robert shaw. on monday, the prime minister stated that the task for our generation was to struggle against terrorism. on
will be campaigning to stay in? >> yes, i want britain to be part of a reformed and successful european union. this argument, this entire argument is about what is in the national interest of britain. [shouting] we want a european union that is more open, more flexible, more competitive, not just good for britain but good for europe, to. >> i don't think that was quite a complete answer to my question, mr. speaker. let's see if we can press them a bit further about how he is going to vote. is he saying, is he saying that if he doesn't achieve his negotiating strategy he will recommend a part-time cancer -- the part-time chancellor can't hang on for a minute. is he saying if he doesn't achieve his negotiation strategy he will recommend britain lead the european union? >> first of all is very welcome, it's accepting the premise the conservatives will win the next election. [cheers and applause] >> and interestingly, an interest in not raising the fact the unemployment figures are down once again today. employment is up why 90,000 this quarter, and the rate of job growth last year was the fastes
of commons last wednesday, he naswered questions about britain's rule in the eu and they talked was about a helicopter crash. this is just over a half hour. >> i am sure the whole house will wish to join me in paying tribute to reginald walker. it is clear to see he was an outstanding soldier and hugely respected and our deepest sent -- a deep sympathies are with his family and friends at this time. so like to mention helicopter crash in central london display but also central london display but also wish to join in sending our thanks to the emergency services for the rapid and professional response to the situation. mr. speaker, this point i had meetings with ministerial and colleagues and others, and in addition to my duties in the south i will have further such meetings later today. >> for too long many women and especially hard working stay-at-home moms have been penalized by the country's pension system for having interruption to their national insurance contributions. after 13 years when the previous government did nothing -- [shouting] >> does the prime minister think that the anno
. in the house of commons last wednesday, he naswered questions about britain's rule in the eu and they talked about the helicopter crash that killed two people. this is just over half an hour. a way that rewards hard work. >> order. questions to the prime minister. >> number one, mrspeake >> thank you, mr. speaker. i'm sure the whole hous will wish to join me in paying tribute to richard reginald walker, 28 engine regiment, attached to 21 engineer regiment. it is clear to see from the tributes paid that he was outstanding soldier and mutual respect. are deep assemblies are are with his family and his friends at this difficult time. mr. speaker, i would also lik to mention helicopter crash in central london display but also central london display but also wish to join in sending our thanks to the emergency services for the rapid and professional response to the situation. mr. speaker, this point i had meetings with ministerial and colleagues and others, and in addition to my duties in the south i will have further ch meetings later today. >> for too long many women and especially ard working s
political union, then it is not for him and not for britain. >> german chancellor angela merkel has chosen her words very carefully, responding at the world economic forum in davos by voicing conditional optimism as far as europe's future goes. she says that patience is needed for structural reforms to take effect. >> she has also called for more regulation of the finance industry to avoid more turbulence, a point of contention with britain. both agree that competitiveness is the key, but how to go about that is the big question. >> david cameron brought his message with him to the swiss alps. in his address to the world leaders in doubles, he repeated his demands for big changes to the u.s. and britain's relationship to it -- in his address to world leaders in davos. >> i'm not just proposing change for britain. i'm proposing change for europe. we are falling behind in the world, over regulating businesses, adding to much to their costs, and leaving our citizens behind. >> after cameron, all eyes turned to the german chancellor. angela merkel reacted cautiously. she avoided confrontation
at the next election, there will be a general referendum on britain's future in the european union. he outlined the new relationships in europe. this is a little bit more than 40 minutes. >> i would like to thank limburg for hosting this this morning. this morning i would like to talk about the future of europe. but first let us remember the past. seven years ago, europe was being torn apart by a catastrophic conflict. the skies of london lit by flames night after night. millions dead across the world in the battle for peace and liberty. as we remember the sacrifice, so we should also remember how the shift in europe for more to sustain peace came about. it didn't happen like a change in the weather. it happened because of determined work over generations and a commitment to friendship and the resolve never to revisit that dark past. a commitment epitomized by the treaty found 50 years ago this week. after the berlin wall came down, i visited that city and i will never forget it. the abandoned checkpoints in the sense of excitement about the future. the knowledge that a great continent
for britain itself because outside of europe it would be difficult. the german foreign minister says that berlin wants them to be an active member, but that cherry picking policies is not an option. the president of the european parliament said that the speech was one of the worst he had heard in a long time. that is just some of the reaction. a german member of the european parliament, we will be going to him in a moment. thank you for being with us here on "gmt." dr. fox, and you can see the problem, can you? you heard it from europe. there are not many people that david cameron can renegotiate with by the sounds of it. >> except for one thing, as a response to the eurozone crisis there will have to be a different relationship inside the european union. many countries want a different relationship from what currently exists. there is going to be changed. the status quo will not be an option. the idea of britain changing the dynamic is disingenuous, but there is going to be changed inside that relationship. we want the direction of travel to be different, a looser relationship. i ha
britain's national interest and do we consult the public about that, or do we set back, do nothing, until the public to go home? i know where i stand. i know where this party stands, and that's in the national interest. >> ed miliband. >> well, let's hope we can find out what he does than today, mr. speaker. i should i suppose congratulate them on one thing, i'm having decide on the date of this speech. well done, well done. another example of the rolls-royce operation of number 10 downing street. [laughter] now, mr. speaker, in advance of his speech, investors need to know what britain did the european union in five years time? >> on important decisions can a first of all congratulate him on an important decision that he faced this week, that is to keep the shadow chancellor in place? [shouting] >> rarely, rarely do we see such cross party support. my view is that britain is better off in the european union, but i think it is right for us -- [shouting] it is right for us to see the changes taking place in europe and to make sure that we are arguing on the changes that britain needs. so t
on britain's future and the european union is his conservative party selected about in the next turn. he outlined a framework for new relationship with europe which included more flexibility, democratic accountability and giving power back to member states. this is 45 minutes. >> good morning and i'd like to thank bloomberg very much for hosting me this morning. this morning i want to talk about the future of europe. but first, let us remember the past. 70 years ago, europe was being torn apart by its second catastrophic conflict in a generation. a war which saw the streets of european cities strewn with rubble. the skies of london led by flames night after night. and millions dead across the world in the battle for piece and liberty. as we remember their sacrifice, so we should also remember how the shift in europe from war to sustained piece in about. it didn't happen like a change in the weather. it happened because of determined to work over generations. a commitment to friendship and i resolve never to revisit that dark past, a commitment epitomized by the police a treaty signed 50
of a french woman serving time for kidnapping. more coming up. >> britain's prime minister says he will let the public decide if they want to stay in the european union if he's reelected. david cameron ended months of speculation by promising a referendum on the question, it he is backing. 2015. however, he said that he prefers britain to stay in member of the you. -- in the -- state a member of the eu. >> i am not a british isolationist. but i want a better deal for britain. but not just for britain, but for europe, too. i speak as a british prime minister with a positive vision for the future of the european union. a future in which britain wants and should want to play a committed and active part. i want completing the single market to be are driving mission. i want us to be at the forefront and also the transformative trade deals with the u.s., japan and india as part of the drive toward global free trade. and i want us to be pushing to prevent europe's smallest entrepreneurial companies from more eu directives. these should be the task that it european officials up in the morning and k
. >> cameron was due to travel to the netherlands to speak about recasting britain sometimes difficult relationship with the european union but instead spent the day in london dealing with events unfolding in algeria, but experts of his speech have been released. he will say that more of the same in the eu is not enough. he is also expected to demand a renegotiation of britain's membership with the block and then put the new terms to a public referendum. critics say he is pandering to euro skeptics in his own conservative party. for more on britain's relationship with the eu, we spoke to the president of the european parliament and asked first why he was so opposed to prime minister cameron's efforts to reclaim some of the powers london has ceded to brussels. >> i think we would need a stronger euro, but not a divided -- a stronger europe but not a divided europe, and i'm really surprised that britain is not a member of the euro. it would be useful that other countries and britain agreed the charter. we need a deeper integration of europe, and not a distraction of the european union. >
't enforced in britain. >> rose: piers morgan for the hour next. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: piers morgan is here. he is the host of "piers morgan tonight." it is the two-yea anniversary of the show's launch. he has interviewed, a colorfulivate of the guests. they range from paris hilton to the calledy llama. earlier in his career he headline the "sun" and "daily mirror. he is bringing his appetite for controversy to america. i am pleased to have him on this program. welcome. époood to see you. >> good to see you, charlie. >> rose: i want to just go to gun control because you waded into this battle. was there a particular thing that set you off, other than the tragedy of 20 innocent children? >> yeah. it was actually-- it was earlier than tt. when i began at cnn in january 2010, it was a week after gabby giffords had been shot. and i was completely shocked, not just by what happened to her and the six people who got killed but the fact that after a week of mourning and general chatter about a debate about gun
project. britain's "daily telegraph" newspaper is reporting that a vice president was killed when the militants attacked. there is speculation someone leaked information about the meeting to extremists. >>> seven japanese nationals have been confirmed dead. their friends and relatives are expressing their sadness and anger. nhk's keiko abe reports. >> reporter: rokura fuchida ran building sites around the world. he was 65 and retired. then his former bosses asked him to lead one more project in algeria. he wrote about it on facebook before he left. >> translator: i am working all over the world to see the twinkling, starlit sky. next, i will see the stars from the desert in algeria. >> reporter: his brother, nitsabu, heard about the hostage taking, then waited day after day for a call from rokura.mnit hostage taking, then waited day after day for a call from rokurinitsa hostage taking, then waited day after day for a call from rokurtnitsa hostage taking, then waited day after day for a call from rokurnitsab hostage taking, then waited day after day for a call from rokuronitsa host
for this whole issue. that's because britain's prime minister david cameron says his country will held a referendum before the end of 2017 on whether to stay in the eu. he announced this amid growing calls to leave the european bloc sparked by the ongoing eurozone debt problems. >> i am not a british isolationist. but i do want a better deal for britain. but not just a better deal for britain. i want a better deal for europe too. so i speak as a british prime minister with a positive vision for the future of the european union. a future in which britain wants and should want to play a committed and active part. >> cameron did emphasize britain should not leave the eu. he insists that staying is in the country's best interests. >>> the japanese government has revised upward its overall assessment of the country's economy for the first time in eight months. the upgrade was due to an improvement in business sentiment stemming from a weaker yen and also higher stock prices. in the monthly report for january released wednesday the government says signs of bottoming out can be seen in some a
britain has been 18th out of 24 growth? >> first of all let me say on high-speed rail come which goes right through the middle of the chancellor's constituency, we are proud of the fact it i is a this government has taken the decision to invest. just as this government that is building crossrail which is the biggest construction plan anywhere in europe. he asked about other european economies. the fact is if you listen to the european union, the oecd, or the imf, they all point out that britain will have the fastest growth of any major economy in europe's -- in europe this year. but i have to ask them, what is his plan? we all know. it is a three-point plan. more spending, more borrowing from more debt. exactly the things that got us in the mess in the first place. >> i have to say we've gotten used to that kind of answer. he promises, he promises a better tomorrow, and tomorrow never comes. that is the reality. and he couldn't deny the fact that we're 18th out of 20 country. were done worse than the u.s.a., worse than candidate, worse than germany, worse than france because of his de
must do better -- >> britain's economy shrank by 2.3%, worse than expected. i could make it more difficult, more expensive for it to borrow. since 2008, britain has emerged from the recession twice now, only to slide back into economic contraction, a double-dip recession. there has never been a triple- dip since the 1950's. actually, uk firms are still hiring people. >> when you look at employment, you have to look at the part of wage growth, and wage growth is negative in real terms. if you take into account inflation. the u.k.'s competitiveness is still improving, and that is why firms who are not getting the headline numbers are still willing to take people on. that is why you see this dichotomy between the employment situation, what is happening to the economy. >> u.k. figures are not good. how does the u.k. compared to continental europe? >> in terms of growth, it is difficult to compare because they go in and out of recession at different times. the unemployment is one of the key ones. britain has done remarkably well. it is something of a mystery, and it has to do with tha
many gun murders were there in great britain? >> how many great white sharks kill people every year but they're scared to swim? >> plus, a man who knows all too well the tragic toll of gun violence. former congressman patrick kennedy. >> i was just disturbed. disturbed as a human being that this is what our civil discourse has come to. >> and i go toe-to-toe with this gun advocate. >> what you're doing is deliberately lying, deliberately twisting it. >> this is "piers morgan tonight." >>> good evening. america's been focusing on guns like never before. i want to revisit the best and the worst of those interviews tonight. first, want to know exactly where i stand on guns. i'm in favor of a nationwide ban on military-style semiautomatic assault weapons and high-capacity magazines. i want to close the gun show loophole and require private dealers to conduct background checks. i want to see president obama increasing federal funding for mental health treatment for all americanses who need it. i think these are perfectly reasonable steps to help this country begin to stem the tide of gun
because more guns means less crime. britain took the guns 15, 16 years ago. tripling of your overall crime. true we have a higher gun violence level, but overall, those men raped that woman to india to death with an iron rod 15 feet long. you can't ban the iron rods. they didn't do it, the tyrants did it. hitler took the guns, stalin took the guns, chavez took the guns, and i'm here to tell you, 1776 will commence again if you try to take our firearms. it doesn't matter how many lemmings you get on the street begging to have the guns taken. we will not relinquish them. do you understand? that why you're going to fail and the establishment knows no matter how much propaganda, they will rise again when you try to take our gun. my family was at the core on both sides because santa ana came to take the guns at gonzalez, texas. piers, don't try what your ancestors did before. come to america, i'll take you out shooting. you can become an american and join the republic. >> are you finished? >> yes, i am finished. you will not take my right. you go through background checks to get guns. how about
organizations that existed in britain even after the end of british slavery, but he was writing and publishing images that in many ways were as important as the activism of those who were politically involved. >> host: why did he come to the states? >> guest: it's one of those fun little stories of the 19th 19th century. the british novelist, william thinker where, who was second only to charles dickens in popularity. wonderfully loved by americans, was on a six-month speaking tour, and eric crow's father was a good friend of zachary's, and so he invited his best friend roz younger son to come along and serve as his traveling secretary but eric crow was already a very highly trained artist, in his early 20s. so as he went around with satchry, traveling up and down the eastern seaboard, he made reservations and he traveled with satchry and made sure everything was taken care of. but he also sketched the whole way he was traveling. and he and zachary differed quite significantly on their impression of slavery in america. zachary decided he would not speak publicly on the topic because ten years
great britain and france are fighting at sea again. refuge at flight -- why asylum seekers in greece want to leave. and good will bringing russians and czechs together. the sad truth is european waters are overfished. another sad truth is europe is failing to take adequate action. yes, the european union is trying to replenish endangered fish stocks by setting limits on how much each eu state can catch of what kind of fish, but there's fierce debate over those quotas every year, and there are some types of fish that are not covered by fishing regulations at all -- scallops, for example. the eu says that since shellfish do not migrate, it is up to countries like britain and france to decide for themselves what is sustainable, but now it seems a scallop war is brewing in the english channel of mid resentment over who fishes what and where. >> this coastal town in southwest england has been provided for by fishing. out at sea, the crew of this trawler had a confrontation with french fisherman staking a claim to the scallop beds. captain smith was quite shaken by the experience. >> espec
america." for the first time, the pentagon allows american women to serve in combat roles. britain, germany, and the netherlands are to their citizens to get out of benghazi, libya in response to an imminent threat against westerners. >> just touched a button. it hands you the picture. >> it brought us a new age of instant photography. tonight, we focus on the man whose polaroids help capture our lives in real time. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. it is time for policy to catch up with reality. that was the message that leon panetta said today as he lifted a ban on women serving in combat. acknowledge in the sacrifices which have already been made by both sexes, he talked of a future where everyone would be given the opportunity to serve in front line rolls. what's the next greatest generation will be one of men and women who will fight and die together to protect this nation. that is what freedom is all about. >> leon panetta there. what do these changes mean and how does the u.s. military compare with other countries like britain? our
earning more than £1 million in britain at the same time as he is raising taxes on everyone else. what do we know from this week? we know that he is a pr man who cannot even do a relaunch. halfway through this parliament, we know that the government are incompetent, that they break their promises and that the nasty party is back. >> it is perfectly clear what has happened since the start of this year. it is this government who are setting out their plans for the future. it is the right honorable gentleman's party that is on the wrong side of the argument on welfare, that has nothing to say about the deficit, and has no credible policy on the economy. he has a shadow chancellor who he will not back, but cannot sack. nothing has changed in politics and nothing has changed in labour. >> does my right honorable friend agree that we should be cutting taxes for hard-working people in basildon and thurrock, rather than taking money away from them only to then return their own money through tax credits? >> my honorable friend is entirely right. of course, he will know that in april every working
by an average of 107,000 pounds for everyone earning over 1 million pounds in britain at the same time he is raising taxes on everyone else. what do we know of this week? he is a pr man who can't even do -- we know that incompetence break their promises and the nasty party is back. it is perfectly clear, mr. speaker, what has happened since the start of this year, increased government setting out its plans for the future, it is his party that is an all wrong side of the argument on welfare, has nothing to say about the deficit, has no credible policy on the economy, he has a shadow chancellor he won't back but can't sack. nothing strange in politics and nothing has changed in labor. >> thank you, mr. speaker. to my right hon. friend agree with me, cutting taxes for hard-working people -- rather than taking money away from them and return their own money from tax credits. >> my hon. friend is entirely right. he will know in april every working family will see a 220 pound tax cuts as we lived the tax threshold yet further. everyone will benefit from that and in our view what we should be do
are on our way to a stronger and more unified eu, with or without britain over time. >> what do you think? >> a little bit too positive to me. i would say europe is probably not coming apart. different said statement than europe is coming together. i think the reason it probably won't come apart is greece, not france. sooner or later, that is the real test. the president of france is taking france in directions that are truly unsustainable economically. but for germany, it's one thing if greece were to leave, but for france, it can't leave. if you're germany, that's the whole core, the whole concept, the dynamic of post-world war ii european integration. germany will go to great lengths, i think really whatever lengths it takes to keep france in. europe will survive but economic growth is not going to take off, it's still going to be extremely weak because it doesn't have in place any of the prequick sists of robust economic growth. >> the head of morgan stanley's emerging markets fund had a piece where he said europe is actually going to bounce back in 2013 because they have paid the pri
a couple years still, but we are on our way to a stronger and more unified eu with or without britain over time. >> what do you think? >> too positive to me. europe is probably not coming apart. different said statement than europe is coming together. the reason it probably won't come together is not greece, it's france. sooner or later, that is the real test. the president of france is taking france in directions that are truly unsustainable economically. france can't leave if you're germany because that's the whole core, the whole dynamic. the relationship. germany will go to great lengths, really, whatever lengths it takes to keep france in. europe will survive but economic growth is not going to take off, still extremely weak because it doesn't have in place any of the prerequisites. >> the head of morgan stanley had a piece where he said that europe is actually going to bounce back in 2013 because they have paid the price, they've done a lot of the difficult reforms that countries often have to do in these kind of crises and that they'll reap the benefits. >> that's starting. greek la
, possibly killing us. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >> how many gun murders were there in britain? >> how many great white sharks kill people every year, but they are scared to swim. >> patrick kennedy, on the radical rant. >> i was disturbed. >> disturbed as a human being this is what our civil discourse has come to. >> i go toe to toe with this gun advocate. >> you are deliberately lying and deliberately twisting it. i want to revisit the best and the worst of the interviews, tonight, i am in favor a ban on semi-automatic assault weapons and high capacity magazines, i want to require prifrt dealers to run background checks on all at gun shows. and i think these are reasonable steps to stop the tide of gun violence. not everybody agrees, several want me deported for my views. one of those behind the petition, alex jones. >> thanks for having me. >> why do you want to deport me? >> we did it as a way to bring attention to the fact that we have all of the froerners, and the chinese government, political power out of a power of a gun, he is the only one who had the guns, we pointed
, if britain says, look, we joined what we thought was a common market. we don't want to be told -- have rulings handed down by the european court all the time and all the red tape for business. if they don't get a repeal for that stuff, where would you stand? >> first of all, i think the whole idea that the european union is only a common market is a fallacy. it's simply wrong. the european union is a political union which uses economic instruments. what i like about cameron is the economic instruments which he suggests. it's less red tape, more single markets, more competitiveness. that's the side that we need to work on and i think that's going to be the idealogical battle in europe in the next couple of years. how much support is that do you think? >> there's a lot of support for those guys who have good economies. the netherlands. i'd argue germany, as well, you saw the reaction of angela merkel on this issue. countries such as denmark, sweden, who all believe in a social security system. >> the mood in davos is getting so good that he thinks he might have time to go cross-country s
to alex jones. and you were talking about these figures from britain and how apparently the gun control in britain has been a fiasco and crime has been through the roof. so i dugout the homicide figures from guns in england and wales by comparison to the united states of america going back to 2003. i'm going to read these quickly to you 2003, gun murders in england 68. in america 11,920. in america 11,624. in 2005, 50 in england, in america 12,352. >> now. >> let me finish. here is my point. every time i hear you say, there is a safer country where you have more guns my brain takes me back to these figures in britain we brought in a handgun and assault weapon ban after a situation where a similar number of school children were murdered with guns. this is what happens when you take a responsible. action. why do you still persist in trying to persuade americans that the opposite is true. >> first of all, the data that you are using for the murder rate in england is a shame. there is a monumental miss reporting of what constitutes murder. >> what an absolute lie. >> well -- you don't know
with their kidnappers. britain, france, the usa, they all said they had not been told that a rescue is being attempted. the british minister said he was not happy. >> mr. speaker, our priority remains the safety of british and the evacuation of the wounded and freeing of hostages. they are going to out jeers, together with other specialists, and the algerian prime minister has agreed my request to fly south as soon as possible to support those involved. >> this remains a crisis with many component parts. military teams have been taking care. some have been moved to the capital city. hostage negotiators are on the ground to help find a solution. and western leaders who helped liberate libya and now say they are ready to fight. >> terrorists should be on notice. they will find no sanctuary, no reference, -- no refuge, not in north africa, not anywhere. >> the longer it goes on, the more it seems other groups may try to attack other targets. aljazeera. >> a former u.s. ambassador and former deputy assistant joins us live. good to have you with us on aljazeera. the situation, the military operation as we
or the experience people say. -- see. >> we apologize. we lost ryan talking about google. britain is rejecting calls over the top -- over the falkland islands. the prime minister david cameron -- christina kirschner urged the u.k. to end. president claims handling of the falkland islands is a cause supported worldwide. 108 years ago on the same day in a blatant exercise of 19th century colonialism, argentina was stripped of the islands which are situated 14,000 kilometers away from london. since then, the colonial power has refused to return the territories to the argentine republic, preventing it from restoring its territorial integrity. she called on britain to abide by resolution inviting both sides to negotiate a solution over the islands. >> my reaction is the future of the falkland islands should be determined by the falkland islanders themselves. the people live there. when i have been asked their opinion they want to maintain their current status with the -- they have been asked their opinion, they want to maintain their curr itent status. last year marked -- their current status. this is on
. for the one size fits all approach, it is costly. we don't have the same demographics as britain and canada. even the health care costs rise dramatically in those countries. and this bill which i read is saying that they would pay out increasing taxpayer funds to increase coverage. you can imagine the costs for this bill would go up dramatically. >> rick, isn't this really what the president's intention was to go to a single payer system? >> frankly i wish it were, but i don't think it was. >> hold on a second. he did say that at one point. i believe we have the tape of him saying that in 2003. let's roll the tape. >> i happen to be a proponent of the universal health care plan. >> there he said it. i am in favor of a single payer universal health care plan. >> what is relevant was in 2003 he was in fact in favor of it. to tell you the truth i think secretly the president is in favor of it. sadly it is no where near where we got in the affordable care act. >> we are moving toward it. that's the point of the congressman. >> first of all what the congressman has propose said not full blown na
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